Intellectual property

Intellectual property, which is often abbreviated to ‘IP’, can be thought of in the same way other types of property can: it is capable of being owned, transferred, leased or licensed.  Just like other types of property, the owner of intellectual property has rights that are protected by the law.  However, there is one obvious difference: intellectual property only applies to intangible property – broadly speaking, ideas and original work.  It can be thought of as the ownership of thought rather than anything physical.

Literature, artworks, music, inventions and even certain colours, smells and jingles are all capable of being protected by intellectual property law.  The distinction needs to be made between the tangible and intangible.   The materials used to paint a painting (the oils and the canvas) are types of tangible property.  The actual painting – that is the ideas contained in it, the style used, the way the colours are used – is intangible and can be considered as an intellectual property.

Why is IP law important?

Given the description above, it is clear that a vast number of situations in everyday life are covered by IP law.  Every time you read a book, use a product, listen to music, watch programs and advertisements on TV, it is more than likely you are being exposed to IP rights.  For good or worse, the modern world would not look the same.   Businesses would lose competitive advantages.  Anyone in a creative occupation would struggle to make a living.

What are intellectual property (IP) rights?

Intellectual property, which is often abbreviated to ‘IP’, can be thought of in the same way other types of property can – it is capable of being owned, transferred, leased or licensed.  Just like other types of property, the owner of intellectual property has rights that are protected by the law.  However, there is one obvious difference: intellectual property only applies to intangible property which includes unique ideas and original work.  It can be thought of as the ownership of thought rather than anything physical.

Literature, artworks, music, inventions and even certain colours, smells and jingles are all capable of being protected by intellectual property law.  The distinction needs to be made between the tangible and intangible.   The materials used to paint a painting (the oils and the canvas) are types of tangible property.  The actual painting – that is the ideas contained in it, the style used, the way the colours are used – is intangible and can be considered intellectual property.

Why is IP law important?

Given the description above, it is clear that a vast number of situations in everyday life are covered by IP law.  Every time you read a book, use a product, listen to music, watch a programs and advertisements on TV, it is more than likely you are being exposed to IP rights.  For good or worse, the modern world would not look the same; businesses would lose competitive advantages and anyone in a creative occupation would struggle to make a living.

More assistance with IP law & rights ?

http://www.ipo.gov.uk/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/law/intellectual-property

http://www.darlingtons.com/site/intellectual_property_solicitors/